To Save the Labor Movement, We Must Destroy the Labor Movement

Kevin Drum is usually pretty solid on labor issues, so it’s more than a little jarring to see him give his qualified endorsement to obvious quackery like this:

Congress should authorize employee associations that are easier to form than current unions, but which do not have the power to interfere with managerial prerogatives (which is pretty much every subject other than employee compensation as determined by a collectively bargained contract). Of course, if the new types of employee organizations are not suffocating their members, they may in fact find it easier than old unions to attract new members.

Author Alan J. Haus never gets around to explaining how unions “suffocate their members,” but apparently it has something to do with a unions’ “power to interfere with managerial prerogatives,” or bargain on anything that doesn’t directly pertain to wages. That’s an odd way to define suffocation.

The maneuver Haus is trying to pull here is an oldie but goody: conflating employee interests with those of management, and suggesting that traditional unions are diametrically opposed to both. The unspoken thesis is that class conflict is something stirred up by innovation-hating unions, not the natural byproduct of a system that relies on worker exploitation. What Haus would have us believe is that everyone can be on the same team, so long as workers don’t put up a fight. In other words: give managers freedom to do whatever they want (except, Haus graciously concedes, when it comes to wages), and the benefits will trickle down to everyone!

I can see why the promise of conflict-free labor-management relations would appeal to Drum, but he should be smart enough to know that Haus is selling snake oil. Ever since the beginning of the 20th century and the advent of scientific management, conservatives and business-friendly “progressives” have foretold a bold new era of cooperation between workers and employers. Mysteriously, realizing this dream has always required that workers cede just a little bit more control of their own labor. And then a little more, and a little more. Haus offers us nothing but a variation on the theme. “Just give up this one more thing,” he promises us, “and this time, I swear, it will happen.”

Well, why take his word for it when we can see for ourselves how it’s worked out so far? I would suggest Drum read his own work to find out.

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2 Responses

  1. Union workers have gotten lazy, having been led to forget that there’s a war on. The unions have become bloated bureaucracies, and their failure was inevitable when they left the ‘shop floor’ and shifted to politics as if they could outspend corporations on lobbying, campaign financing, bribery, etc. Let’s get rid of the unions so the blinders are off, so we can no longer delude ourselves into thinking anything less than the abolition of capitalism will suffice.

  2. So the following topics would be inappropriate for union concern? Workplace safety. Scheduling of shifts. Lengths and schedules of breaks and lunches. Overtime possibilities for different workers. Mandatory overtime. Workplace conditions. Allocations of unpleasant/desirable duties. Managerial evaluations of workers. Unreasonable production demands. Promotions. Hiring and firing of workers. Scheduling of vacation and sick time requirements.

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