Question for Readers

Maybe one of the friends of the blog can help me out with this. I’ve noticed a lot of chatter about “liberaltarians” over the past week, but not much explanation of what that actually means. Does that mean socially liberal libertarians? And isn’t the word for that … “libertarian?”

Or is liberaltarianism not ideological at all, and more of a matter of approach? Is it just what you use to describe libertarians who want to make common cause with liberals on certain issues? And who in their right mind would oppose that?

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3 Responses

  1. http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=6800

    Opposition is not so much pragmatic as philosophical: there are areas where liberalism and libertarianism simply cannot come to terms, but any attempt to do so effectively weakens the liberal case.

  2. 1) Not ideological, but strategic. Libertarians have long allied with conservatives due to similarities on economic issues, and are only now considering allying with liberals.

    2) Libertarians who view opposition to the welfare state as more critical than opposition to an exploding military budget or nanny state will probably oppose such an arrangement.

  3. What Dylan said, plus this link from Jacob Levy’s blog that explains his rationale for an alliance and what it would mean for both sides:
    http://jacobtlevy.blogspot.com/2008/10/liberals-and-libertarians-common-cause.html

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